Sunday, June 27, 2010

Congresswoman: Hezbollah joining Mexican drug cartels

A small fence separates densely populated Tiju...Image via Wikipedia

  • read more on www.ynetnews.com
    WASHINGTON – North Carolina Congresswoman Sue Myrick warned Friday that Hezbollah may be colluding with drug cartels on the US-Mexican border, and called on Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano to investigate the matter.

  • read more on www.ynetnews.com
    "It is vital we know what is happening on our border, especially as crime and violence continue to rise there and as terrorist plots and threats are increasing inside the US," she wrote.

  • read more on www.ynetnews.com
    Myrick said Hezbollah's drug agents undergo Spanish language lessons sponsored by Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, after which they disguise themselves as Mexican civilians in order to obtain false US entry passes.

    She added that the group has experience with tunnel-digging, which may put the US-Mexican border at risk for further infiltration.

    The congresswoman, who is a member of the House Intelligence Committee, said members of drug cartels imprisoned in South America have been spotted lately tattooing Persian writing on their bodies, evidence of Iranian involvement.

    "Persian influence that can likely be traced back to Iran and its proxy army, Hezbollah," she said.

  • read more on www.nytimes.com

    Narco tunnel into US traced to drainage ditch in Juárez

    By Alex Hinojosa and John Hall \ El Paso TimesPosted: 06/27/2010 12:00:00 AM MDT
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    EL PASO -- Mexican authorities on Saturday found the beginning of a tunnel dug 2 1/2 feet under the Rio Grande that was used to smuggle drugs into the United States, officials said.
    The tunnel, about 130 feet long and 2 feet wide and 2 feet high, was traced to a drainage ditch along a highway near the river.
    "Once we discovered it, they backtracked it and that's where they found it," U.S. Border Patrol Agent Ramiro Cordero said.
    The tunnel was discovered about 1:30 a.m. Friday by Border Patrol agents who heard suspicious noises.

  • read more on www.periodico26.cu
    U.S. authorities said the tunnel is a sign of growing frustration on the part of drug smugglers to beat efforts by law enforcement in the U.S.
    "All that we have done since 1993 has created more desperation for the smuggling operations now, and they are much more prone to putting juveniles from Mexico at risk," Border Patrol spokesman Doug Mosier said.
    "As hard as it is to accept or understand, these thMEXICO CITY — From perfecting their use of the subjunctive in colonial Puebla to exploring the anthropological aspects of Tijuana's gritty underside, American college students have long used Mexico as a learning lab. This summer, however, far fewer will be venturing across the border, as universities and students alike fear the violence tied to drug gangs that have caught some innocents in the cross-fire. ings are happening."

  • read more on mexico.usembassy.gov


    Mexico Security Update

    The following information is provided as an overview of recent security incidents that, because of their location or nature, could have an impact on the safety of U.S. citizens traveling and living in Mexico.  This information is not intended to include all safety and security incidents that have occurred in Mexico.  Readers should review the U.S. Government's Country Specific Information and the latest Travel Warning issued for Mexico, as well as monitor local and U.S. media sources for the very latest information.


    MEXICO CITY — 

    From perfecting their use of the subjunctive in colonial Puebla to exploring the anthropological aspects of Tijuana's gritty underside, American college students have long used Mexicoviolence tied to drug gangs that have caught some innocents in the cross-fire. — From perfecting their use of the subjunctive in colonial Puebla to exploring the anthropological aspects of Tijuana's gritty underside, American college students have long used Mexico as a learning lab. This summer, however, far fewer will be venturing across the border. 

     


    Washington Deploys Drones to Patrol Border with Mexico

    Washington, June 25, (RHC).- The United States plans to deploy two drone aircraft along the Texas-Mexico border as part of a new effort to stem organized crime and illegal immigration, according to Homeland Security chief Janet Napolitano.
    Speaking in Washington, Napolitano said that the two Predator drones will be used to patrol the border and in nearby areas in the Gulf of Mexico, once the U.S. Congress approves the 500 million dollars that President Barack Obama has requested for the project.


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