Thursday, August 18, 2011

How Dangerous Is Facebook's Facial Recognition Software? | IdeaFeed | Big Think

facial recognition systemImage by city burns via FlickrThe more and more I have studied on this, the more I have found that this could be a very dangerous system of technology. That most people don't seem to think about. I know several people, I mean hundreds that the last thing they need is thier past to catch up to them to literally ruin thier lives. This tech and the new internet regulations will put many of these people in serious danger.
To be able to take a picture of someone walking down the street, and then to find them on either Facebook or Google plus in and instant, find out who they are and follow thier every move. Is this dangerous or not? People need to wake up and think about this.
http://bigthink.com/ideas/39556

Face_recognition
What's the Latest Development?
Rather than laboriously tagging photos of your friends, Facebook released facial recognition software last winter that makes educated guesses about who is in your photos. Rolling out the software slowly and allowing users to opt out quelled criticism but a new study from Carnegie Mellon "finds that the technology can help researchers locate people's social security numbers, just from the information on their Facebook profiles and their photo." With a 30 percent success rate, researchers were able to find the last five digits of an individual's social security number.
What's the Big Idea?
Facebook has become notorious for its violations of privacy, simultaneously earning it the status of the world's most loved and hated website. Because most people on Facebook use their real identity, the social networking platform has become a powerful identification tool. And while we are accustomed to thinking about Internet privacy as regards our online lives, given advances in programs like facial recognition software, we should consider how online privacy will affect our real lives. Facebook currently faces legislation over giving user data to advertisers.
Read it at The Atlantic Wire

The Dangers of Using High Tech Facial Recognition Software to Catch Criminals

http://www.ghacks.net/2011/08/14/the-dangers-of-using-high-tech-facial-recognition-software-to-catch-criminals/
In light of the rioting in London, British police have been using CCTV in combination with facial-recognition software footage in order to identify and separate the criminal elements in the crowd. The article goes on to speculates on the need of creating a database for “confirmed” faces (primarily faces that can be linked to an identity). The article even illuminates the issue of quality control and some of the problems that lighting, distance, and clarity plays in distorting and inevitably making it harder to match. With facial recognition technology commonly found in television and movies unavailable, combined with the likely chance to misidentify individual (which could also be used to benefit criminals); it seems that British officials have the daunting task ahead of them. Also police fear that people who resemble rioters (solely the images) may be in danger

Dangers Of Facebook Face Recognition On Picture Uploads


http://www.techwench.com/dangers-of-facebook-face-recognition-on-picture-uploads/

Dangers Of Facebook Face Recognition On Picture Uploads
Ok, I think this is one of the more problematic features of Facebook with dramatic potential of invading your privacy much more than you ever wanted. Facebook is activating face recognition for photos that users upload to their Facebook profiles. And as always, Facebook is activating this feature by default and the user has to turn it off afterwards.

I don’t care what everyone does on Facebook, I do not use it for me personally. However, I think there are quite a few privacy issues involved in this one. What if somebody uploads a picture of a group of people and the software recognizes you even though you do not want to be recognized and name tagged? I mean, how do we know what happens down the road with this type of information?! The invasion of our privacy is immense and profiling and tracking of people can be become a huge issue. We’re already being tracked with the cell phones that we carry around. Now imagine you are walking through a subway station one day and the same software that recognized you on Facebook connects to the camera system in public places. Yes, I know it is a long stretch, but think more like “Big Brother” scenarios. Right now it is just Facebook. Other companies are doing the same thing. They are not connected today, they might be connected tomorrow.
And still more to come on this subject. If you don't see a link yet go to the home page to read more.
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