Monday, September 19, 2011

Online ID Verification Plan Carries Risks using RFID Chip and Biometrics to get online.

Hand with planned insertion point for Verichip...Image via WikipediaMany people actually think this could be a good thing. Using Biometrics to prove who you say you are. Though on the outside this seems like a great idea. On the inside, this is no different than numbering the Jews to wipe them out.

Social Media climbs at extreme rates. People hacking sites and information are only making it even worse for the people who use everything honestly.

The general idea of RFID seems to reflect a very good idea to keep track of products and animals. But now? The Dream Act, Obamacare and several other bills passed are pushing the idea to track and have ALL personal information on a chip. Using things like eye scans or fingerprints, Facial recognition to prove who you say you are. Sound like a good idea? You may want to re think before you begin supporting this major issue everyone seem to want to ignore today.

http://todaysworldnewsinfo.blogspot.com/2011/05/new-imf-report-us-dollar-needs-to-be.html

All online data is easily hacked. Not some, Security is mostly just word not reality when it comes to online hacking. This also includes everything we use today. From your Cell phone or what they call Smart phones, anything basicly with the word Smart is a tracking system. That's why its called Smart. Also, All your info on your phone is and can be hacked. GPS for location, Facebook and G plus for who you are and what you look like, Friends and family and so on.

http://todaysworldnewsinfo.blogspot.com/2011/03/national-chip-id-card-for-american.html

There is also, New cards with RFID chips that combine all this information and is stored in a database. Along with new cars, plugs to go into your car. (for better rates) so they say. Gaming devices that go online, All social media, and phone numbers, banking info and the list goes on and on and on. All this can and will be placed on these chips. All for the your safety as it's called.



What many people don't know is that anyone with an 8 dollar scanner can and will and have already hacked these chips and shows how easy it can be done. Yet, it seems most don't have a clue about this. You can do a simple search on this site using the Word RFID. I have several links on this show this information. I will also post a few here.

http://todaysworldnewsinfo.blogspot.com/2011/05/76-countries-just-agreed-to-666.html


http://todaysworldnewsinfo.blogspot.com/search?q=RFID

See more here.
http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/1567045/rfid_technology_soon_to_mark_us_all.html?cat=15
And here.
http://www.squidoo.com/NewWorldRFID
http://www.squidoo.com/RFIDpart2
http://www.squidoo.com/RFIDNewWorldpart3


Now look at this article and think, Is this really a good Idea?

See the full article here.
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/18/business/online-id-verification-plan-carries-risks.html?_r=1
Consumers who still pay bills via snail mail. Hospitals leery of making treatment records available online to their patients. Some state motor vehicle registries that require car owners to appear in person — or to mail back license plates — in order to transfer vehicle ownership.
But the White House is out to fight cyberphobia with an initiative intended to bolster confidence in e-commerce.
The plan, called the National Strategy for Trusted Identities in Cyberspace and introduced earlier this year, encourages the private-sector development and public adoption of online user authentication systems. Think of it as a driver’s license for the Internet. The idea is that if people have a simple, easy way to prove who they are online with more than a flimsy password, they’ll naturally do more business on the Web. And companies and government agencies, like Social Security or the I.R.S., could offer those consumers faster, more secure online services without having to come up with their own individual vetting systems.
If the plan works, consumers who opt in might soon be able to choose among trusted third parties — such as banks, technology companies or cellphone service providers — that could verify certain personal information about them and issue them secure credentials to use in online transactions.
Industry experts expect that each authentication technology would rely on at least two different ID confirmation methods. Those might include embedding an encryption chip in people’s phones, issuing smart cards or using one-time passwords or biometric identifiers like fingerprints to confirm substantial transactions. Banks already use two-factor authentication, confirming people’s identities when they open accounts and then issuing depositors with A.T.M. cards, says Kaliya Hamlin, an online identity expert known by the name of her Web site, Identity Woman.
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