Friday, January 6, 2012

Passwords to become fossils by 2017 RFID, Biometrics, HandScan ID cards

Traceless Biometrics Flowchart
Image via Wikipedia
As many of you already know I've spent a lot of time searching and studying this very topic. It seems the more it comes out the more hush, hush seems to come out on this very topic. Anyone that know anything about the Bible knows what this system actually is.
It's not rocket science to figure out what the technology brings. After all Eventually we will no longer be able to buy or sell without it right?
As I continue to keep you up to date in all this. Here are a few more articles below that just may interest you all.
But first I want to add this very scripture yet one more time for those that may not know it.
Revelation 13
15 He was granted power to give breath to the image of the beast, that the image of the beast should both speak and cause as many as would not worship the image of the beast to be killed. 16 He causes all, both small and great, rich and poor, free and slave, to receive a mark on their right hand or on their foreheads, 17 and that no one may buy or sell except one who has the mark or[f] the name of the beast, or the number of his name.
18 Here is wisdom. Let him who has understanding calculate the number of the beast, for it is the number of a man: His number is 666.
 http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Revelation%2013&version=NKJV

See more at the links below to each article.
http://www.zdnet.com/blog/igeneration/passwords-to-become-fossils-by-2017/14138

Passwords to become fossils by 2017?

By | January 1, 2012, 8:30am PST
Summary: IBM’s predictions for the next five years — fossilized passwords and biometric scanning for all.

IBM recently released its annual tradition of five predictions for five years in to the future — among them, the belief that passwords will become redundant.
Generation Y, rejoice! No longer will you struggle with attempting to remember the password for your Facebook account, Twitter, Gmail, games networks — the list goes on. We’ve all had those moments, cursing under our breath, when after three attempts you are locked out just as you remember the actual word and number combination. Or even worse, forced to fill out mud-smear captchas until your eyes start to swim.
According to IBM, future generations won’t need to suffer this kind of hardship.

Will Biometrics Go Mainstream In 2012?

IBM thinks so, and the US-VISIT program may give a glimpse into the future. But what about data theft?

As a kid, I marveled at movies featuring retina or hand scanners, or instant DNA analysis to authenticate the bad guy to his vault. As an adult, I figured these devices would mean the end of passwords and spoofing and would bring the collision of sci-fi future and real-world security. Sadly, I still don't have a retina scanner at my desk. What I do have are so many passwords that I need a password manager to keep them straight.
I don't blame companies for hesitating to invest--biometrics systems still have problems, despite IBM’s prediction of advances. A prime example is how some fingerprint readers fell victim to the highly advanced gummy bear attack, in which a user acquires a gummy bear, applies it to the reader, and presses down. The sensor reads the fingerprint from the last user, which has now transferred to the gummy bear. The reader is defeated, the gummy-wielding attacker is authenticated as the previous user, and the system has become worthless. Organizations have been forced to replace hardware and software in light of this attack and revert to legacy methods, such as passwords, that are not vulnerable to rubbery candy.

UMaine using hand scanners at dining halls to deter sharing of ID cards

See The full article here at this link.
http://bangordailynews.com/2011/12/25/news/bangor/umaine-using-hand-scanners-at-dining-halls-to-deter-sharing-of-id-cards/
Posted Dec. 25, 2011, at 5:19 p.m.

A student uses a hand scanner as she enters the Hilltop Dining Hall on the University of Maine campus in Orono. The scanners were installed this fall to ensure the person using the facility is the one that payed for the services. The  devices compare biometrics data to those on file and were installed at three of the residential dining halls on campus.
A student uses a hand scanner as she enters the Hilltop Dining Hall on the University of Maine campus in Orono. The scanners were installed this fall to ensure the person using the facility is the one that payed for the services. The devices compare biometrics data to those on file and were installed at three of the residential dining halls on campus. Buy Photo
ORONO, Maine — Hand scanners are now commonly used for students to gain entry to University of Maine dining halls as a way to foil the costly sharing of student identification cards.
The hand scanners, installed in Hilltop, Wells and York dining commons last semester, are mandatory for all students with an unlimited meal plan. Within the next few years the university plans to require their use by all students who eat at the dining halls.
The scanners were installed to keep costs down and eliminate the sharing of MaineCards, a practice that can cost UMaine up to $4,100 per card, the price of a meal plan for an academic year, according to Director of Auxiliary Services Dan Sturrup and Director of Dining Operations Kathy Kittiridge.
“The scanners were installed to ensure the integrity of our contracts so we can keep our prices low,” Sturrup said in an interview.
“If people are sharing meal plans, it increases food costs, which in turn increases the costs overall for students,” Kittiridge added.
The scanners cost UMaine $331 per unit. The total expense was about $5,000, including installation costs, which came directly out of the auxiliary services budget, according to Sturrup and Director of Technology Management Benny Veenhof.


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