Monday, May 23, 2011

Netanyahu speech to Congress eyed for sign of U.S.-Israel rift Obama far from Christian.

 If we believe the Bible and call ourselves Christians. Then it's obvious this man running our Country is far from being a Christian.

Joel 3

http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Joel%203&version=NKJV

God Judges the Nations
 1 “For behold, in those days and at that time,
      When I bring back the captives of Judah and Jerusalem,
       2 I will also gather all nations,
      And bring them down to the Valley of Jehoshaphat;
      And I will enter into judgment with them there
      On account of My people, My heritage Israel,
      Whom they have scattered among the nations;
      They have also divided up My land.
       3 They have cast lots for My people,
      Have given a boy as payment for a harlot,
      And sold a girl for wine, that they may drink.
       4 “ Indeed, what have you to do with Me,
      O Tyre and Sidon, and all the coasts of Philistia?
      Will you retaliate against Me?
      But if you retaliate against Me,
      Swiftly and speedily I will return your retaliation upon your own head;

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/05/23/us-mideast-usa-netanyahu-idUSTRE74M6OM20110523?feedType=RSS&feedName=topNews

President Barack Obama meets with Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington, May 20, 2011. REUTERS/Jim Young

WASHINGTON | Mon May 23, 2011 6:25pm EDT
(Reuters) - When Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu addresses Congress on Tuesday, many will be watching to see whether he escalates a war of words with the White House over how to make peace in the Middle East.Netanyahu has a mostly sympathetic ear in Congress, where few lawmakers in either party speak up for the Palestinians, hewing to decades of close U.S.-Israeli ties.
But the Israeli prime minister has had a rocky relationship with President Barack Obama, and last week said the president's vision of a Palestinian state based on the borders of 1967 could leave Israel "indefensible."
Obama articulated that vision on Thursday in a major policy speech on the Middle East. His position essentially embraced the Palestinians' view that the state they seek in the West Bank and Gaza should largely be drawn along lines that existed before the 1967 war in which Israel captured those territories and East Jerusalem.
On Sunday Obama seemed to ease Israeli anger somewhat when he made clear that the Jewish state would likely be able to negotiate keeping some settlements as part of a land swap in any final deal with the Palestinians.
Netanyahu voiced appreciation for those comments, and some analysts think Netanyahu will not further escalate the quarrel with Obama in his remarks to Congress on Tuesday.
"Netanyahu will most likely try to tone down any perceived differences between his position and the president's, because his disagreements with President Obama have become counterproductive for both and ultimately undermine Israel's own interests," said Haim Malka, of the Center for Strategic and International Studies.
But Republicans in Congress, including House leaders, are not about to drop their criticism of the Democratic president's newly articulated Mideast vision.
House Republican Leader Eric Cantor said Monday that Obama's comments on Middle East borders left "most Americans ... just questioning what kind of strategy there is. It doesn't make sense to force a democratic ally of ours into negotiating with now a terrorist organization" about land swaps.


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