Sunday, July 4, 2010

July 4th: A Day for Thankfulness

It's a Grand Old Flag...Image by KM&G-Morris via Flickr

July 4th: A Day for Thankfulness






  • read more on www.newsrealblog.com
    "Because we live in a largely free society, we tend to forget how limited is the span of time and the part of the globe for which there has ever been anything like political freedom: the typical state of mankind is tyranny, servitute, and misery." – Milton Friedman




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    Independence Day is a day to be thankful. This civilization didn't just fall into the hands of the world — although it did merely fall into our own. And yet, as Ronald Reagan would have reminded us: the love of freedom is not genetic. It is not passed along through bloodlines. We must be conscious guardians of civilization. But we cannot do that without understanding America's virtues — and truly internalizing our love of them
     




  • read more on www.959watd.com
    In Plympton, a reading of the Declaration of Independence, Constitution and Bill of Rights.
    A couple of dozen people assemble in the gazebo on the town green to read the United States of America's founding documents. This was earlier today, July 4th.
    Steven Ziglar says he hopes the Fourth of July observance becomes a tradition in Plympton.
    "It's a great thing to read the founding documents, to study them, and to really listen and try to understand the words," he said.




  • read more on www.wnd.com
    Independence Day never meant more
    Posted: July 03, 2010
    1:00 am Eastern
    © 2010 
    Tomorrow Americans will take the day off, watch ballgames, barbecue in the backyard, watch fireworks displays and fly the flag.
    But I'm hoping they will do more than that this Independence Day.
    Given the state of our nation this July 4, 2010, I recommend everyone sit down with their family and their friends and read the Declaration of Independence. It's a document that is as relevant today as it was when it was written 234 years ago.
    You've got to read it like you were reading it for the first time – with a fresh perspective. It might help that Americans are in the embrace of a tyranny very familiar to the founders who wrote and signed this historic document.




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    we can relate well to the founders' complaints:
    • government was failing to perform the limited responsibilities the institution was required to perform;
    • government was exceeding its authority;
    • government was violating individual rights;
    • government was obstructing immigration laws;
    • government was obstructing justice;
    • government was turning the land into a police state;
    • government was superseding the established laws of the land.
    Yes, indeed, I can relate.




  • read more on motorcitytimes.com
    Stick 'till the end, Grandpa nails the questions:
    It's telling that the grandfather new the answers to the questions. It make you wonder when schools stopped teaching the basics of history.




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    Most People know the first verse of our National Anthem. But, have you ever heard the second verse?
    You might be surprised.




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    Have an Awesome 4th of July Everyone. May God bless you all and our great Nation.

    The Star Spangled Banner Lyrics
    By Francis Scott Key 1814



    Oh, say can you see by the dawn's early light
    What so proudly we hailed at the twilight's last gleaming?
    Whose broad stripes and bright stars thru the perilous fight,
    O'er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming?
    And the rocket's red glare, the bombs bursting in air,
    Gave proof through the night that our flag was still there.
    Oh, say does that star-spangled banner yet wave
    O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave?

    On the shore, dimly seen through the mists of the deep,
    Where the foe's haughty host in dread silence reposes,
    What is that which the breeze, o'er the towering steep,
    As it fitfully blows, half conceals, half discloses?
    Now it catches the gleam of the morning's first beam,
    In full glory reflected now shines in the stream:
    'Tis the star-spangled banner! Oh long may it wave
    O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave!

    And where is that band who so vauntingly swore
    That the havoc of war and the battle's confusion,
    A home and a country should leave us no more!
    Their blood has washed out their foul footsteps' pollution.
    No refuge could save the hireling and slave
    From the terror of flight, or the gloom of the grave:
    And the star-spangled banner in triumph doth wave
    O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave!

    Oh! thus be it ever, when freemen shall stand
    Between their loved home and the war's desolation!
    Blest with victory and peace, may the heav'n rescued land
    Praise the Power that hath made and preserved us a nation.
    Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just,
    And this be our motto: "In God is our trust."
    And the star-spangled banner in triumph shall wave
    O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave!

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